26 April 2016

Quick Book Review: Consciousness

My rating: 5 of 5 stars








Lifting the flaps in George Bartisch’s Ophthalmodouleia. This 1583 book on ophthalmology includes flaps that allow readers to “dissect” the layers of the head and brain.


Lifting the flaps in George Bartisch’s Ophthalmodouleia. This 1583 book on ophthalmology includes flaps that allow readers to “dissect” the layers of the head and brain.


This remains as my most favorite book so far on consciousness and I'm biased because I own a copy of it. It's both a textbook, and a reflection on the the psychology and neuroscience of consciousness, packed with biological information and tidbits of the author's musings and experiences. Another aspect of the book that I adore much are the art reproductions (specifically surrealism), poetry and quotations at the beginning of every chapter. It's hilarious how J. Allan Hobson pokes fun at at psychoanalysis, saying why do so many people fell for this 'brainless approach.'

Though it's limited in scope considering the advancement in the understanding of consciousness in both its material and philosophical aspects, over-all, this book is a wonderful read. It's also where I gained new information on some scientists working on the topic by incorporating it on other fields such as physics, namely Roger Penrose, et alia.